Tuesday, September 21College Admissions News

Graduate Admissions

Stronger Partnerships with State Allies to Protect Student Borrowers
Graduate Admissions

Stronger Partnerships with State Allies to Protect Student Borrowers

Stronger Partnerships with State Allies to Protect Student BorrowersAs the chief operating officer at Federal Student Aid (FSA), I am committed to ensuring that borrowers receive high-quality service that helps them access the benefits granted by law. The work we do at FSA is crucial for protecting the more than 43 million Americans who have federal student loans. FSA and the U.S. Department of Education can’t do it alone. In my experience as Ohio attorney general and later as the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, I saw the importance of state regulation and oversight to identify problems and deliver relief when companies take advantage of people. I have also seen how essential it is in our system of federalism that officials from different parts of our government can ...
The pandemic hit moms hard, and that stress can trickle down to kids
Graduate Admissions

The pandemic hit moms hard, and that stress can trickle down to kids

The pandemic hit moms hard, and that stress can trickle down to kids Get important education news and analysis delivered straight to your inbox It’s well-known that women have been especially impacted by pandemic-related economic upheaval. But new data show how widespread the job loss and emotional strain have been for mothers of young children in particular. One-third of moms with children birth through age 5 have had to stop working or reduce their hours during the pandemic, according to a new report based on surveys of 1,000 caregivers and released by the Rapid Assessment of Pandemic Impact on Development- Early Childhood, or RAPID-EC, a national bi-weekly survey of households with children ages five and under. (That’s actually slightly lower than the percentage of mothers ...
Graduate Admissions

Walking the Virtual Quad: How to Build a Thriving Enrollment Community

Walking the Virtual Quad: How to Build a Thriving Enrollment CommunityBy Katy Kappler, Co-Founder and CEO, InScribe, and Dr. Jonathan Huck, Research Scientist, WGU Labs The decision to apply to college, even for older students, can be a lonely, high-stakes journey. Price tags are often shrouded in mystery. Outcomes for graduates can be vague. And confusing terms (registrar, bursar, oh my!) appear at every turn. These challenges, however, are often mitigated at traditional universities, where students can find answers and build a sense of connection with an institution by walking its grounds, smelling its flowers, and taking lively tours. Unfortunately, these advantages are absent in the online learning space. How, then, to foster a sense of belonging among applicants who may never set foot...
Explore U.S. History at our Nation’s Most Hallowed Ground
Graduate Admissions

Explore U.S. History at our Nation’s Most Hallowed Ground

Explore U.S. History at our Nation’s Most Hallowed GroundArlington National Cemetery  (ANC) is considered America’s most hallowed ground and a sacred shrine to service and sacrifice. More than 400,000 people are laid to rest at ANC including former presidents, astronauts, civil rights activists, medical professionals, and prominent military figures. ANC recently launched an education program for students, families, and lifelong learners. The program aims to honor the sacrifices and extraordinary lives of American service members and their families, support remembrance of the past and present military conflicts and circumstances surrounding them, and invite personal exploration of connections to America’s diverse history. As the school year draws to a close, this program provides a great su...
3 Questions for EdTech & Publishing Expert, David Harris
Graduate Admissions

3 Questions for EdTech & Publishing Expert, David Harris

3 Questions for EdTech & Publishing Expert, David Harris David Harris is the Editor In Chief of OpenStax at Rice University. David graciously agreed to answer my questions: Disclaimer:  The views and opinions expressed here are those of David Harris and do not necessarily reflect the positions or policies of OpenStax. Q1:  How has the pandemic impacted the broader OER (open educational resource) movement, and OpenStax specifically? The pandemic has left no part of the education ecosystem untouched, and OER is no different.  A recent Bay View Analytics report suggests that overall faculty awareness of OER has grown during the pandemic. When the country went into lockdown in March 2020 we saw a massive migration online to synchronous and asynchronous learning experiences.  In the 9 months th...
Graduate Admissions

The local impact of foreign censorship laws

The local impact of foreign censorship lawsIt can be tempting to look at censorship in other countries and conclude that it’s troubling, but far away, and we should save our worrying for what happens here. Most people are, for good reason, much more concerned about the impact of the laws in the country in which they live. But this attitude can fail to account for how censorship functions, especially in an era in which the internet, digital surveillance, frequent international travel, and global industries have made some foreign laws less constrained by borders and more difficult to combat. For the last several years, FIRE has been covering the complex relationship between American higher education and global censorship, including the difficulties of protecting speech on satellite campuses ...
Graduate Admissions

So to Speak podcast: Comic book panic!

So to Speak podcast: Comic book panic!Rebellion! Crime! Juvenile delinquency! On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, producer Chris Maltby explores the rise of comic books in the early 20th century and the moral panic, book burnings, and censorship that followed. Show notes: You can subscribe and listen to So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and Stitcher, or download episodes directly from SoundCloud.  Stay up to date with So to Speak on the show’s Facebook and Twitter pages, and subscribe to the show’s newsletter at sotospeakpodcast.com. Have questions or ideas for future shows? Email us at sotospeak@thefire.org. Published at Thu, 20 May 2021 13:48:26 +0000 Article source: https://www.thefire.org/so-to-speak-podcast-comic-book...
OPINION: New leadership at the top should mean big changes for English language learners
Graduate Admissions

OPINION: New leadership at the top should mean big changes for English language learners

OPINION: New leadership at the top should mean big changes for English language learnersWhen I started my career as a fourth grade bilingual teacher, I was given two binders. One included academic standards for my state. The other was filled with the English language development (ELD) standards. My job was to ensure that my students, all of whom were categorized as English learners (ELs), met these grade-level and proficiency standards by the end of the year. This required extra time to create my own lesson plans, adapt our school curriculum and find supplemental materials to help my students connect with the grade-level content. That’s because the curriculum I was given didn’t consider their language needs and was devoid of the cultural richness EL students bring to the classroom. Twenty ...
Just Admit It: How did the 2020-21college admissions cycle go?
Graduate Admissions

Just Admit It: How did the 2020-21college admissions cycle go?

Just Admit It: How did the 2020-21college admissions cycle go?Our Top Takeaways from the 2020-21 College Admissions Cycle It’s safe to say that the 2020-21 college admissions cycle was unlike any other. Between canceled SAT and ACT exams and campus tours going virtual, the COVID-19 pandemic created several significant changes for applicants over the past year. Now that this application cycle is coming to a close, our college admissions experts are sharing their top insights about the 2020-21 season and what it might mean for future applicants. Keep reading for our team’s top takeaways and, if you’re looking for even more insights, check out the latest Just Admit It! podcast episode. An Uptick in Applications  One of the most noteworthy developments during the 2020-21 admissions cycle was ...
Escaping the Academic Equality Quagmire
Graduate Admissions

Escaping the Academic Equality Quagmire

Escaping the Academic Equality QuagmireEscaping the Program Equality Quagmire Academic programs, and the courses that deliver their content, are not of equal importance.  The implications of this came home to me recently when, in a webinar on academic resourcing, a participant objected that provosts and deans should not “put their thumbs on the scale” by considering program importance when deciding admission targets and departmental budgets.  “All programs and courses are of equal importance,” the participant asserted. “Providing their quality is good, all should have equal access to funding.” I was reminded of an example I used when describing growth by substitution in Reengineering the University (p. 27): “I’ve got good news and bad news about one of your programs” [the provost told the...
Caring for Students During COVID
Graduate Admissions

Caring for Students During COVID

Caring for Students During COVIDIn the weeks leading up to our class’s final assignment, I received a number of emails from students. Some wanted feedback on the drafts they’d created so far, and some wanted to apologize for late work, to ask for extensions, to check in about their grades or the quality of their work so far. No matter the topic, however, each one had been typed with the same tone of sheer and absolute panic. They were overly apologetic (“I’m so sorry to have to ask this”), filled with unnecessary reassurances (“I promise my work isn’t usually like this”), clearly sent in a rush (“please, if you have the time”) and filled with obvious expectations of rejection and shame (“I understand if this isn’t possible”). To say that the recent pandemic has been disruptive to academia ...
Graduate Admissions

‘Fordham should be ashamed’: Bitter outcome for pro-Palestinian group after university’s four-year fight to censor

‘Fordham should be ashamed’: Bitter outcome for pro-Palestinian group after university’s four-year fight to censorLast week, the New York State Court of Appeals declined to hear the appeal of the student-plaintiffs in Awad v. Fordham University, a case challenging Fordham’s 2017 denial of recognition to a prospective chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine on account of the group’s viewpoint. The decision from New York’s highest court leaves in place a state appellate court’s December 2020 ruling in favor of the university. Fordham should be ashamed of itself. This outcome is a bitter setback for student expressive rights at private universities in New York. Any person or organization committed to freedom of expression on campus should be deeply disappointed and concerned by this r...
News From the North Pole
Graduate Admissions

News From the North Pole

News From the North PoleA Little Cheer for a Dreary Year   The holidays are upon us, and the North Pole has never been busier! Amid all the bustle, Santa is as jolly as ever, now that he and Mrs. Claus are speaking again, after an epic fight over the modification of Santa’s suit. It seems Santa did not appreciate the “quarantine fifteen” jokes.   The North Pole’s employment rate hit an all time high this year, as over one million seasonal worker elves poured into the region from all over the globe. In a recent interview, Mrs. Claus was showing signs of strain: “I am awfully tired of cooking for the vegan elves from Oregon. I simply can’t understand why they refuse my Reindeer Ratatouille, despite my assurances that it contains neither arctic reindeer nor French rats.” Santa is not thrille...
University of South Carolina President Resigns After Speech Blunders
Graduate Admissions

University of South Carolina President Resigns After Speech Blunders

University of South Carolina President Resigns After Speech Blunders Nearly a week ago, students graduating at the University of South Carolina heard their president, Robert Caslen, a retired Army lieutenant general, give a commencement speech about how they had prevailed during the coronavirus pandemic. Since then, General Caslen’s words at the ceremony on May 7, meant to inspire, have drawn accusations of plagiarism and confusion over his mistakenly naming the wrong university. On Wednesday, General Caslen resigned. “I am sorry to those I have let down,” General Caslen wrote in an email to students, the faculty and the staff announcing his resignation, effective on Thursday. “I understand the responsibilities and higher standards of senior level leadership. When those are not met, trust...
Why Summer Learning Programs Are Pushing More Fun Than Academics
Graduate Admissions

Why Summer Learning Programs Are Pushing More Fun Than Academics

Why Summer Learning Programs Are Pushing More Fun Than AcademicsThe weather may be warming up, but this year more than ever, “school’s out for summer” won’t be true for thousands of students across the country. After more than a year of teaching under quarantine, school districts have big plans for summer learning. It’s a time to bring kids back together in person, try to address at least some academic stagnation due to COVID-19, and maybe most importantly, have fun. Thanks to the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund (ESSER) and its $6.1 billion allocated specifically to address learning loss, district leaders are coming up with programs that far exceed the dull image of traditional summer schooling. We call it a summer of learning and joy. Joy is not a throw-away term. ...