Saturday, July 31College Admissions News

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An essay writer who's a dean only mentions his faculty title (letter)
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An essay writer who's a dean only mentions his faculty title (letter)

An essay writer who's a dean only mentions his faculty title (letter)To the Editors: I just finished reading "Academic Prioritization and the Faculty's Social Contract" by Brian Peterson, and I felt I needed to write to mention a significant, troubling factual inaccuracy and to respond to Peterson's central premise. First, the factual inaccuracy: it is true that Peterson is "chair of the department of philosophy and religion and professor of economics," as his bio says, but he leaves out that he is also Associate Dean for Curriculum and Faculty Development -- a full-time dean position that does not include teaching, other than a 1-credit college success course for transfer students." In other words, he writes this piece not as a faculty member who "teaches students," as the final para...
How Schools Can Adapt Pandemic Protocols to Support Students’ Mental Health
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How Schools Can Adapt Pandemic Protocols to Support Students’ Mental Health

How Schools Can Adapt Pandemic Protocols to Support Students’ Mental HealthTwo years ago, I had the distinct honor of facilitating a conversation with Lorena Sanabria, a student who was present during the 2017 Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school shooting in Parkland, Fla., at a national education conference. As we sat together on stage, Lorena, who was 17 years old at the time but wise far beyond her years, shared that one of the hardest things after the tragedy was the pressure to go “back to normal.” Within weeks of a shooting that killed 17 people, well-meaning teachers and parents were encouraging Lorena and her peers to reclaim their old lives. But, as she shared, “We were trying to tell them that normal will never be ‘normal’ again.” Lorena’s words struck a chord with me that day, a...
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US College Admission and “Crazy Rich” Chinese

US College Admission and “Crazy Rich” ChineseIn reading NACAC’s spring Journal article, “History of Chinese Student Mobility and Today’s Trends,” I was struck by some of the differences in my experiences and observations working with Chinese families, who by law are not permitted to attend international schools. Working on the ground in China gave me a lot of insight about why Chinese families choose the US for their child’s education. In 2009, when I was first working in China, it quickly became clear that many Chinese love Americans and everything American—food, music, clothes, education…. For the next five years, I consulted with a small Chinese company that sought to bring the US AP curriculum into their public schools. We traveled all over China to meet with Chinese families, from Be...
Professor: Why I teach the much-debated 1619 Project — despite its flaws
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Professor: Why I teach the much-debated 1619 Project — despite its flaws

Professor: Why I teach the much-debated 1619 Project — despite its flawsThese are gruesome details, but they are the sorts of details largely missing from the collective consciousness of the United States when it comes to slavery. More, they are details that can be related to conditions still shaping the lives of African Americans. For example, in her 1619 essay on medical inequality, Linda Villarosa cites studies indicating that myths about Black people, such as their resistance to pain, continue to influence modern medical education, resulting in inadequate pain management of Black and Hispanic people compared with White people. Published at Mon, 14 Jun 2021 13:37:47 +0000 Article source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2021/06/14/professor-why-i-teach-controversial-1619-pr...
Teachers across the country protest laws restricting lessons on racism
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Teachers across the country protest laws restricting lessons on racism

Teachers across the country protest laws restricting lessons on racismOn May 24, Tennessee approved a law that intimidates teachers into lying to students about the role of racism, sexism, and oppression throughout U.S. history. As a part of a national day of action against similar laws being proposed in states nationwide, we’ll walk downtown Memphis to highlight historical markers that describe events in Memphis history that teachers would be forced to lie or omit facts about to ensure compliance with the new law. Overall, the law brings the state government into our classrooms to restrict the ways teachers can discuss race, sexism, and oppression in American history. The law uses vague language to ban teachers from talking about racial/social privilege and responsibility for the effects ...
Nun Stole Over $800,000 to Support Gambling Habit, Prosecutors Say
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Nun Stole Over $800,000 to Support Gambling Habit, Prosecutors Say

Nun Stole Over $800,000 to Support Gambling Habit, Prosecutors Say As a Catholic nun, Sister Mary Margaret Kreuper had taken a vow of poverty. But this week, prosecutors said Sister Mary Margaret, 79, had agreed to plead guilty to stealing more than $835,000 from a Catholic elementary school to support a gambling habit and to pay for other personal expenses. Sister Mary Margaret was charged on Tuesday with wire fraud and money laundering while she was the principal of St. James Catholic School in Torrance, Calif., the office of the U.S. attorney for the Central District of California said in a statement. She is scheduled to appear in the Federal District Court in Los Angeles on July 1. Sister Mary Margaret admitted to a “fraudulent scheme” in which she “lulled St. James School and the adm...
Colorado Bans Legacy Admission
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Colorado Bans Legacy Admission

Colorado Bans Legacy Admission iStockLast month, Colorado became the first state in the nation to ban the consideration of a student’s legacy status in the admission process. The new law applies to Colorado’s public colleges and is aimed at reducing economic and racial disparities within higher education. “As a first-generation college student raised by a single mom, I can remember the anxiety I felt filling out the college application when they asked if I had family that had attended the institution,” Colorado state Rep. Kyle Mullica told CNN. “I remember wondering if I said ‘no’ if it would hurt my chance at getting in,” noted Mullica, one of the bill’s sponsors. “With House Bill 1173 we are making sure students get into school based on merit and their hard work, and not their family re...
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Open Letter from Stanford Law Faculty Members Regarding the Nicholas Wallace Case, June 4, 2021

Open Letter from Stanford Law Faculty Members Regarding the Nicholas Wallace Case, June 4, 2021Open-Letter-from-Stanford-Law-Faculty-Members-Regarding-the-Nicholas-Wallace-Case-June-4-2021_RedactedPublished at Fri, 04 Jun 2021 20:13:32 +0000 Article source: https://www.thefire.org/open-letter-from-stanford-law-faculty-members-regarding-the-nicholas-wallace-case-june-4-2021/
Drawing on Ancient Arts and New Technology, Husson U. Launches Degree in Extended Reality
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Drawing on Ancient Arts and New Technology, Husson U. Launches Degree in Extended Reality

Drawing on Ancient Arts and New Technology, Husson U. Launches Degree in Extended Reality There are plenty of digital gadgets that can make users feel as though they’re being transported through time and space. But the sensation of being immersed in another era or a different realm is much older than today’s VR headsets. The origins of the experience may come from an ancient artform: theater. “As a set designer, I would think about experiences that are recreating augmented reality, essentially,” says Brave Williams, an associate professor at Husson University in Maine. “It is an augmentation of reality that has been done for thousands of years.” Now, Williams is helping his institution push the boundaries of Shakespeare’s famous line that “all the world’s a stage.” The professor has drawn ...
French Heir Gives Pissarro Stolen by the Nazis to University of Oklahoma
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French Heir Gives Pissarro Stolen by the Nazis to University of Oklahoma

French Heir Gives Pissarro Stolen by the Nazis to University of Oklahoma A Jewish family whose relatives had their artworks looted by the Nazis said on Tuesday they were giving up their claim to a Pissarro painting and transferring ownership to the University of Oklahoma, where it had been on display until 2017. Léone Meyer, whose family’s collection was looted by the Nazis, said she was giving up her long-running efforts to donate the painting to the Musée d’Orsay in Paris where it has been exhibited in recent years. Title to the work, “La Bergère,” or “Shepherdess Bringing in Sheep,” would instead go to the University of Oklahoma under an agreement that would ensure the painting continues to be exhibited in both countries. “I have now regained my freedom at a price that I fully accept,”...
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In challenge to Georgia’s anti-BDS law, federal district court sides with journalist disinvited from Georgia Southern University

In challenge to Georgia’s anti-BDS law, federal district court sides with journalist disinvited from Georgia Southern UniversityThe United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia, Atlanta Division, ruled earlier this week that plaintiff Abby Martin’s case against Georgia Southern University administrators for violating her expressive and due process rights may proceed. The ruling signals that a Georgia statute prohibiting state entities from entering contracts with individuals or companies engaged in a boycott of Israel violates the First and Fourteenth Amendments, the latest in a string of defeats for state laws targeted at anti-Israel boycotts.  Martin is a journalist, advocate for Palestinian civil rights, and supporter of the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions movement (...
12 Expected Family Contribution Tips
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12 Expected Family Contribution Tips

12 Expected Family Contribution TipsOne of the biggest questions that parents with college-bound children puzzle with is if their child has a chance for financial aid. The first step that you should take when grappling with this issue is to obtain your Expected Family Contribution (EFC). You should do this before seriously exploring your teenager’s college options. This is more confusing than you might think because at some schools a family could qualify for need-based aid if they make $180,000 a year and at another school, the ceiling for aid could be $60,000 or lower. 12 Expected Family Contribution Tips Here is a summary of what you should know about this important figure: EFC Tip No.1: An Expected Family Contribution is a dollar figure that represents what financial aid formulas believ...
Admission into Foreign Universities during the Time of Pandemic
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Admission into Foreign Universities during the Time of Pandemic

Admission into Foreign Universities during the Time of PandemicIf you were planning to begin your higher studies abroad this year or the past year, chances are Covid-19 pandemic has already ruined your plan. Or maybe you’re wondering about studying abroad next year but you’re not sure whether your application will be affected.   With travel restrictions and new visa rules, Covid-19 has crushed the dreams of millions of Indian students looking to study abroad. Let alone the practical challenges, they’re simply unwilling to go and live abroad at this time of global uncertainty.  Amid such chaos and confusion, we’ve put together some important information for you. Read on to know about admission to foreign universities during this unprecedented time.  Admission into Foreign Universities are S...
Yearbook Photos of Girls Were Altered to Hide More of Their Chests
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Yearbook Photos of Girls Were Altered to Hide More of Their Chests

Yearbook Photos of Girls Were Altered to Hide More of Their Chests There had been rumors all day that the yearbook photos had been altered, said Riley O’Keefe, a ninth grader at Bartram Trail High School in St. Johns County, Fla. When she finally got her copy, Ms. O’Keefe, 15, opened the page to her photo and laughed in disbelief. A black bar had been added to cover more of her chest, she said. Then, Ms. O’Keefe thumbed through the rest of the yearbook. Dozens of other students — all girls — had similar edits, many of them clumsy alterations that covered more of their chests. Ms. O’Keefe said she had been confused at first, then furious. Other girls approached her and said the alterations made them feel sexualized and exposed. Many students and parents are now demanding an apology. Th...
How Texas Republicans Want to Recast History
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How Texas Republicans Want to Recast History

How Texas Republicans Want to Recast History In the Trump era, California’s Democratic-led state government emerged as a kind of resistance government-in-waiting. State lawmakers passed some of the nation’s strictest environmental protections, took steps to ensure universal access to health insurance and filed dozens of lawsuits against Trump administration policies. Now that the presidency has changed hands, the shoe is on the other foot. It’s now Texas — the second-most-populous state in the country behind California, and by far the largest red state — that presents the starkest contrast to the White House. On Monday, Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, announced that Texas would stop allowing its residents to receive federal pandemic-related unemployment benefits. That comes a few weeks af...