Monday, May 16College Admissions News

College Planning

How Long Does It Take to Get SAT Scores Back?
College Planning

How Long Does It Take to Get SAT Scores Back?

Don't you wish you could find out how you scored on the SAT right after you finish taking the test? Or maybe you'd like to forget all about it and pretend it never happened (better luck next time)! Either way, your wait time for your SAT scores will be the same: somewhere between two and six weeks. This article fills you in on all the details of SAT score reporting and offers some advice for what to do once you get your scores.   When Do You Get Your SAT Scores? How long does it take to get SAT scores back? It's a good question, and one that's on everybody's minds after the exam. SAT multiple-choice scores are released 13 days after you take the SAT. (One exception is the June test date, which typically has a score release date about five weeks after the test.) After years of having ...
Don’t Be Like Most Parents And Waste Time: How To Start The College Application Process Right Now
College Planning

Don’t Be Like Most Parents And Waste Time: How To Start The College Application Process Right Now

  I have a story for you. Two of my close friends recently sent their kids to college back in the 2018 fall semester. This was the first kid either of them was about to put through college so it was an important milestone for both parent and child.   They dropped off their teenager’s suitcase, helped set up the dorm room and then waved goodbye to their little kid, all grown up now and at the very beginning of their new adult life.   Now, both of my friends are well aware of what I do for a living so they each told me about their experience with the whole college process.   One of my friends, let’s call him John for the sake of privacy, is very happy with where his child is going to school. His kid got into her dream school and...
Where to Find the Best DBQ Examples
College Planning

Where to Find the Best DBQ Examples

One of the best ways to prepare for the DBQ (the "document-based question" on the AP European History, AP US History, and AP World History exams) is to look over sample questions and example essays. Doing this will help you to get a sense of what makes a good (and what makes a bad) DBQ response. That said, not all DBQ essay examples are created equal. We'll briefly cover what makes a good DBQ example and then provide a list of example essays by course. Lastly, we'll give you some helpful tips on how to best use sample essays in your own preparation process. What's a Good DBQ Example? Without a doubt, the best sample resources come from the College Board. This is because they are the ones who design and administer the AP exams. This means the following: Any DBQ essay example that th...
Reach, target and safety schools: Don’t slip when creating a smart college list
College Planning

Reach, target and safety schools: Don’t slip when creating a smart college list

A critical part of the college search process is creating an excellent list of colleges, which often includes reach, target and safety schools. Families often slip badly on this extremely important yet tricky task of pulling together a solid college list. If a teenager creates a problematic list, parents can easily pay too much money for college. One of the key issues when creating a solid college list is to understand the definition of these terms: High school counselors commonly recommend that students apply to all three types of schools. This, however, can be a more costly move in many cases. First, let’s break down what each is. Reach schools Definition: Reach schools represent colleges and universities where students have a low chance of gaining admission. The most well-known of the ...
Full Guide to Choosing (2022, 2023)
College Planning

Full Guide to Choosing (2022, 2023)

The SAT is offered seven times a year, but which SAT test dates will work best for you and your schedule? What essential factors should you consider before creating an SAT schedule? What are the best SAT dates for juniors? For seniors? In this comprehensive guide, we offer you the most current info on SAT test dates (domestic and international) for 2022-2023. We also give you our top tips for choosing the best SAT test dates for you as well as tons of resources to help you navigate the complicated web of SAT/ACT test dates.   SAT Dates and Deadlines 2022-2023 In general, the College Board administers the SAT on Saturdays, with more tests offered in the fall. If you can't take the test on a Saturday for religious or other reasons, Sunday alternate dates are usually available. Below, we gi...
Tutor Your Way To A College Acceptance (While Doing Good)
College Planning

Tutor Your Way To A College Acceptance (While Doing Good)

getty One needs simply to turn on the news to realize that we are a world divided. But what if, instead of a battlefield, the world was a schoolhouse? This is Khan Academy founder Sal Khan’s vision, and his latest education endeavor seeks to “connect the world through learning.” When a high school student in Oklahoma can offer free tutoring to an adult from Guatemala in calculus, or a professor in India can tutor a middle school student in Alabama in statistics, an enduring bond is formed that pushes aside politics and forgoes fences. The universality and interrelatedness of collaborative learning transcend the myriad of issues that polarize us. It is what Khan describes as an “unambiguous good.” Oh, and an added bonus is that it just might help you get into college. W...
Title IX protects transgender students, Biden’s Education Department says
College Planning

Title IX protects transgender students, Biden’s Education Department says

Title IX protects transgender students, Biden’s Education Department says“It could very well be a game-changer,” David Hinojosa, director of the Educational Opportunities Project at the nonprofit Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, said in an email. “States accept federal moneys and agree not to discriminate on the basis of race, sex, etc., under federal laws including Title IX. If they are discriminating against students on the basis of gender, they could be jeopardizing their funding.” Published at Wed, 16 Jun 2021 20:09:59 +0000 Article source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2021/06/16/title-ix-transgender-students-discrimination/
Combining Online Courses With In-Person Supports, ‘Hybrid Colleges’ Unite
College Planning

Combining Online Courses With In-Person Supports, ‘Hybrid Colleges’ Unite

Combining Online Courses With In-Person Supports, ‘Hybrid Colleges’ Unite Over the past decade, brick-and-mortar outposts have popped up across the U.S. to offer students who take online college courses a physical space to study and interact. In Denver, there’s a suite in an office complex. In Austin, there’s an airy hall that resembles a co-working facility. In Philadelphia, there’s room in a modern high-rise. Calling themselves “hybrid colleges,” these mini campus centers have set big goals for themselves, such as bringing college within reach for people historically left out of higher education. Now, more than a dozen of these nonprofits are strengthening their bonds and committing to shared goals by creating the Hybrid College Network. “The network is incredibly collaborative. They’re ...
Harvard Class of 2025 Yield
College Planning

Harvard Class of 2025 Yield

Harvard Class of 2025 YieldJune 8, 2021 Harvard’s yield soared to a record high for the Class of 2025 (photo credit: Caroline Culler). Harvard University has announced that 85% of students admitted to its Class of 2025 will be matriculating. This marks a record yield for the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based institution. To put the figure in context, for the Class of 2024, 81% of admits chose to matriculate. The previous record high yield was for the Class of 2021 when 84% of admits chose to attend Harvard. And in addition to the 85% of admits to the Class of 2025 who will be on campus next fall, 349 students who opted to take a gap year after earning admission to the Class of 2024 will join them this fall. As Vivi E. Lu and Dekyi T. Tsotsong report for The Harvard Crimson in a piece enti...
One year later, child care closures aren’t as bad as feared— but long-term issues still loom
College Planning

One year later, child care closures aren’t as bad as feared— but long-term issues still loom

One year later, child care closures aren’t as bad as feared— but long-term issues still loom Get important education news and analysis delivered straight to your inbox When the pandemic shut down much of the country in March 2020, June Shillito reluctantly kept the Yates Baptist Child Development Center in Durham, North Carolina, open. She was nervous about the health of her staff and families, but she wanted to be able to provide an income for her teachers and serve children of essential workers. Even when her enrollment fell from 52 to 11 children, she was able to pay her staff members because the church affiliated with her center received a federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan. Although children have slowly returned to the center, Shillito’s classrooms still aren’...
Two Black Students Won School Honors. Then Came the Calls for a Recount.
College Planning

Two Black Students Won School Honors. Then Came the Calls for a Recount.

Two Black Students Won School Honors. Then Came the Calls for a Recount.The parents of the just-named valedictorian and salutatorian left the ceremony, aware that Emma and her father were upset, but thinking nothing of it. Over the next day, however, the parents of Emma and Dominic did their own homework. “We found the 2020-2021 handbook,” Mr. Berry said. “It all came down to the handbook.” At issue was just how to calculate who the top two students were. Ikeria and Layla won based on a calculation of quality point average or Q.P.A., a system of calculating grades that gave extra weight to advanced placement and dual credit courses. But, it turned out, Dominic and Emma were the top two finishers based on unweighted grade point average. Join Michael Barbaro and “The Daily” team as t...
First Amendment News 300: A Q&A interview with Laurence Tribe on freedom of expression 
College Planning

First Amendment News 300: A Q&A interview with Laurence Tribe on freedom of expression 

First Amendment News 300: A Q&A interview with Laurence Tribe on freedom of expression “Few if any (on the bench, in the profession, or in the academy) have contributed more to our understanding of the First Amendment than has Laurence Tribe. Through his unparalleled record of scholarship and advocacy, Professor Tribe has done much to secure broad judicial and legislative protections for the full range of First Amendment freedoms.” — Robert Corn-Revere* * * * Prof. Laurence Tribe To commemorate the 300th posting of First Amendment News, I invited Professor Laurence Tribe, the Carl M. Loeb University Professor and Professor of Constitutional Law (emeritus), to participate in a “Question and Answer” exchange. He kindly agreed.  While many in the legal community and related fields know of his...
Is the Charter Schools Program financing white-flight academies?
College Planning

Is the Charter Schools Program financing white-flight academies?

Is the Charter Schools Program financing white-flight academies?However, the privilege of segregation came with a cost — $5,000 a year in tuition that parents decided taxpayers should assume. As North Carolina teacher Justin Parmenter explains here, the academy’s parents created a Google site called “Let’s Charter Hobgood” to band together and convert the private academy to a charter school. In what looks like an attempt to allay any fears that the charter might be forced to integrate, the following was posted: “No current law forces any diversity whether it be by age, sex, race, creed.” After three attempts, parents pulled it off, and Hobgood Academy became a charter school. Published at Mon, 07 Jun 2021 17:38:52 +0000 Article source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2021/06/...
Technology Made Special Education Parents Better Advocates During the Pandemic
College Planning

Technology Made Special Education Parents Better Advocates During the Pandemic

Technology Made Special Education Parents Better Advocates During the PandemicAs schools let out for summer, there are undoubtedly aspects of the past year that teachers and parents alike are ready to leave behind. But then there are the benefits that some are hoping stick around. Among them: better communication strategies and tools that make it easier for special education parents and teachers to interact. Those are lessons that should stay in place long after our current era of remote learning, says research analyst Lane McKittrick, who focuses on special education and families at the Center on Reinventing Public Education. She recently co-authored a report on how charter schools effectively supported students with disabilities during the pandemic and is blogging about the topic. “If yo...
College Planning

So to Speak podcast transcript: The Constitution of Knowledge with Jonathan Rauch

So to Speak podcast transcript: The Constitution of Knowledge with Jonathan RauchNico Perrino: Welcome back to So to Speak, the free speech podcast where every other week we take an uncensored look at the world of free expression through personal stories and candid conversations. I am, as always, your host Nico Perrino. We have an exciting podcast and livestream video for you all today. We’re going to be discussing The Constitution of Knowledge, A Defense of Truth which is Jonathan Rauch, his fourth coming book. When is it due out, Jonathan?Jonathan Rauch: June 22nd Nico: Very exciting. Greg Lukianoff: There’s still time to preorder. Jonathan: Mark your calendars. Yeah, the hardcopy showed up the other day. Greg: Woo hoo. Jonathan: There it is, back from the printer. Greg: That’s gorgeous....